Eaton Takes New Anti-Counterfeit Measures

Eaton Takes New Anti-Counterfeit Measures

Power management company introduces laser-etched labels for circuit breakers to help authenticate parts, combat counterfeiting.

Power management company Eaton announced the launch of new laser-etched labels to be featured on its molded case circuit breakers (MCCBs). Laser etching is one of many new technologies companies are using to help combat the counterfeiting of electrical products, and Eaton says its method provides more permanent markings “helping to authenticate each circuit breaker throughout its lifecycle.”

“Providing these more permanent markings on circuit breaker labels is part of Eaton’s ongoing effort to help prevent unsafe copies from being manufactured and making it into the marketplace,” said Tom Grace, brand protection manager, Eaton’s Electrical Sector–Americas. “The addition of new laser-etched labels demonstrates Eaton’s investment in anti-counterfeit technologies and its commitment to combat counterfeiting worldwide.”

Common counterfeit electrical products such as circuit breakers can lead to costly repairs, property damage, and even serious injury or death because they have not been properly manufactured or tested, the company explains.

Eaton laser-etches certain information directly onto each circuit breaker, including ratings, specifications, and product information. With the information included on the label, customers can authenticate the breaker using the company’s Circuit Breaker Authentication (CBA) tool, which helps customers detect whether Eaton’s MCCBs up to 400 amperes are counterfeit. Customers can access the tool at www.eaton.com/counterfeit.

The new laser-etched labels are in production for 2-Pole, F-Frame, and Series C breakers and will be rolled out to all F-Frame MCCBs, with plans to expand to additional industrial circuit breakers.

The announcement follows other recent anti-counterfeiting news from Eaton. Over the summer, Grace was a featured speaker at an American Bar Association panel discussion on the dangers of counterfeit products. The panel focused on the problem of dangerous counterfeits that pose a heightened risk to human health and safety, addressing possible solutions from policy, legislation, implementation, and legal perspectives.

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