MEMS Semiconductor Sales and Shipments Set to Rebound

After declining in 2012, MEMS semiconductor sales are projected to grow by nearly 12% and reach $12.2 billion between 2013 and 2018.   

MEMS (microelectromechanical)-based semiconductor sales, which encompass sensors and actuators, are forecasted to grow 14% in 2014 and reach a new record-high of $8 billion—surpassing 2011’s peak of $7.1 billion. The new report by IC Insights, 2014 O-S-D Report—A Market Analysis and Forecast for Optoelectronics, Sensors/Actuators and Discretes, says the growth is due in part to demand for new multi-sensor platforms, wearable systems, and the Internet of Things.

MEMS technology has spread quickly into high-volume electronic products and now accounts for 70% of today’s semiconductor sales, the group reports. Despite that growth, 2012 total device sales declined 1% and stayed at $7 billion in 2013, possibly due to price erosion in MEMS-based sensors, which includes accelerometers and gyroscope devices. According to the report, MEMS semiconductor sales will rise by a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.7% through 2018 and reach $12.2 billion. This is an increase when compared to the CAGR of 9.8% during 2008-2013. In 2015, sensor and actuator sales will jump 16% to $9.2 billion. After increasing just 4% in 2013, sensor sales alone are projected to increase 16% to $4.4 billion in 2014—a  welcome rebound, but still below the sector’s high growth rates in recent years.

 “The challenge for MEMS sensors will be coming off extremely high growth rates in the past five years, which were mostly concentrated in a few major applications, such as smartphones and interactive video games, along with steady increases in automotive electronics,” according to IC Insights, which reports that MEMS sensor unit shipments surged by a CAGR of 35% between 2008 and 2013—more than double the 15% annual growth rate expected in the next five years.  

See IC Insights website for more information.

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